UPCOMING SHOWS  

Jane Chancellor Moore Gallery
15th Anniversary
Invitational Exhibitions
Summer 2019 - Spring 2020

Painting Exhibition
featuring
Tona Barkley
Betty Beshoar
Karen Carey
Marta Dorton
Kathleen Esser
Sarah Heller
Staci Maney
Bob McWilliams
Karen Mitchell
Susan Moore
Stephanie Potter
Keiko Stumbo
Richard Taylor

July-September 2019


Photography Exhibition
A Louisville Photo Biennial Participant
featuring
Jan Albers
Rhett Beck
Linda Fugate Blumer
Doug Dearinger
Marilyn Donaldson
Lisa Huber
Darrell Kincer
Larry Moore
Susan Moore
Reba Rye
John Sarsgard

September-November 2019


Printmaking Exhibition
Participants to be announced
November 2019-February 2020


Art in the Winner's Circle XV
Selected Student Artwork from the
Kentucky Derby Museum

February-May 2020


Mixed Media Exhibition
Participants to be announced
May-July 2020
KENTUCKY EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION
100 MOORE DRIVE
FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY 40601
(502) 564-5597
GALLERY HOURS
M-Th 8am-5pm, F 8am-6pm, Sat 9am-1pm  
APPEARING IN THE GALLERY
ABOUT THE GALLERY

The Jane Chancellor Moore Gallery is
an alternative art space operating since
2004 in the lobby of Kentucky Employees
Credit Union in Frankfort, Kentucky, by
Larry W. Moore for Broadstone Media.

The gallery provides an opportunity to
see and purchase original art in a variety
of mediums created by local and
regional artists both emerging and
established.

In addition to the current show, we
carry works on consignment by many of
our  artists, including Stephanie Potter,
Rhett L Beck, Joan Schulte, Melanie
Sunbeam Smith, Jamie Sheppard, Marta
Dorton, Les Greeman, Lloyd Kelly, and
Susan Moore.

For information on purchasing art or
exhibiting in the gallery, contact us at
our business office:

Broadstone Media LLC
418 Ann Street
Frankfort, Ky  40601-1929
(502) 223-4415
BroadstoneMedia@aol.com
OUR GALLERY MISSION

"In our experience as gallery curators, we
have found that the introduction of the right
work of art into a person's home or life can,
and has, added immeasurably to the quality of
some of our patron’s lives.  Even those simply
passing by and viewing have told us how much
they appreciate our shows.

It is part of our gallery philosophy that art is
incomplete until it is seen and appreciated.  
The role of Broadstone Gallery is to find the
artists, display their works, and give those
who might appreciate their art a chance to
see it.

To us, art represents not only beauty, but
hope and optimism. Especially in these
distressed times, art is an important reminder
that these are still part of the human spirit.  
We hope to be able to continue to foster it for
a long time to come.

Thanks to our artists, our patrons and
especially to our gracious hosts at KECU for
their support."

Jane Chancellor Moore (1951-2010)
Jane Chancellor Moore was the curator of
Broadstone Gallery from its opening until her
untimely death in the spring of 2010, at which
time KECU renamed the gallery in her honor.
Jane is pictured in the photo above, in the
center in the background.  That was
appropriate, for while she was very much the
center of everything we did at Broadstone,
she also preferred to remain in the
background.  For more photos and information
about Jane, please
click here to visit our
memorial page.

MARTA DORTON
process/progress:
evolution of a concept

Reciprocity Series

New Mixed Media Works


February 25 - March 4, 2019

Artist's Reception
Friday, May 10, 5:00-7:00pm
Marta Dorton is certainly no stranger to the gallery, having appeared in her first show
back in the winter of 2007/08, and in numerous group shows since then; but somehow
she has not had a solo show with us before, a situation I am delighted to remedy with
this exhibition.

Most art exhibitions present the finished product; but though each of the pieces in this
show is indeed a finished - and delightful - work of art, Marta pulls back the curtain on
her creative process, and allows us to witness how a single theme can evolve through
many different treatments.  No one of the works is the final statement of her theme.  
Through this series she reminds us that in art, as in life, it is not the end that matters,
but the process, and - we hope - progress.

Marta describes this series in terms that unite art and science, dealing with both
microcosm and macrocosm.  In looking at these geometric forms I am reminded on the
one hand of the fleeting traces of the most minute particles we can discern (pun on
CERN intended) with our most modern tools of physics, and on the other of the
intricate mechanics of the Ptolemaic vision of a clockwork cosmos.  Art, as Marta
shows us, is another instrumentality through which we can find our place in the
universe, and witness its beauty.


                                                          Larry W. Moore, curator
Curator's Statement
Artist's Statement
The Reciprocity series is serving as a method to explore and understand time, space
and place and as a format to underline our connections to Earth and each other. The
series explores themes of connection, bindings, diversity and kinship.

The designs consist of segmented circles containing color, forms or the white of the
substrate. I see these areas as layers of time and space, micro/macro,
 past/present/
future and idea/concrete.

Experimentation defines my process. My vision of an artwork is not always set in stone.
I may choose to allow artistic accidents and new ideas to alter the original concept or
final look of a piece. I tend to welcome medium accidents and the knowledge gained.

I don’t always know where my method will lead but I love to experience the variety
along the journey, to see what is over the next hill, then the next.

Emphasis is not on precision. Imperfections are allowed. I use found circle-makers
(plates, bowls, containers) from my immediate surroundings to describe all of time

and space. The bleeding and softening of lines, flowing colors over borders, crayons’
resist to water media are exciting to watch in real time. Collage elements include
fabric, drawings, printmaking pieces, found items. The works on canvas are a return

to the brush. My years of painting with a squeegee are coming to a close due to joint
problems in my hands. Holding a brush is a homecoming for me, a comforting return

to my artistic roots.

My process has taught me that art truly reflects life – making plans yet accepting
outcomes/changes/side trips, infinite possibilities, the blurring and pushing of lines,
rethinking areas that didn’t work, placing the next best step – all require faith to

move forward while not knowing the end result. For me, acceptance is the key to
art, and to life.

                                                        Marta Dorton